Creative Resolutions

Insights and creative observations

Why you need to use dedicated landing pages

Online advertisement that uses dedicated landing pages typically sees a conversion increase of at least 25% – Omniture Whether your campaign is capturing leads or direct downloads and sales, dedicated landing pages are a highly effective way of increasing conversion-rate (the number of successful actions performed by visitors). Unfortunately, many businesses still neglect the use of dedicated landing pages, promoting a campaign solely on their main website instead. This is not the best way to maximise your conversion-rate. So in order to get the best results out of your marketing campaigns in 2016, you need to start using dedicated landing pages. One page, one purpose Landing pages are created for a single purpose, typically lead-generation, and consist of a single web page, where visitors ‘land’ on after clicking through from an ad banner or URL link. Because there is no navigation, engagement is focused rather than explorative, which means visitors are only tasked with one thing at a time and this makes conversion-rates much higher. Capturing people’s attention is what captures leads The key to why landing pages are so effective is their ability to capture people’s attention, which based on relevance and usefulness. Because you are sending the user straight to a landing page, which consists of dedicated content, optimised marketing, and a simple way for customers to complete a purchase or signup, there’s very little reason for them to leave your page and look elsewhere for what they want. Below is a visual breakdown of how a landing page is used to capture interest once the user is taken straight there (instead of the main website) via an online ad. 1. Engaging headline With just a few seconds to capture the user’s attention, the landing page headline parallels that of the headline in the original ad to quickly establish relevance and leads with value to keep the user engaged.  2. Main image Imagery is used to support the headline. It also helps the user to connect with the promotion on a deeper level, as people are more receptive to visual communication than written text. 3. Main copy Dedicated copy, rich with motivational language, is used to expand upon the initial lead-in and keep the reader engaged, all the whilst selling the promotion so that the user is prepped for conversion. 4. Call to action The call to action (CTA) is where the user performs the desired action. This might be a sign-up, purchase, or download, and should involve nothing more than filling out a simple form or clicking a button. The CTA is really the whole point of having a landing page in the first place – making the process as clear and simple as possible. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

Online advertisement that uses dedicated landing pages typically sees a conversion increase of at least 25%

– Omniture

Whether your campaign is capturing leads or direct downloads and sales, dedicated landing pages are a highly effective way of increasing conversion-rate (the number of successful actions performed by visitors).

Unfortunately, many businesses still neglect the use of dedicated landing pages, promoting a campaign solely on their main website instead. This is not the best way to maximise your conversion-rate. So in order to get the best results out of your marketing campaigns in 2016, you need to start using dedicated landing pages.

One page, one purpose

Landing pages are created for a single purpose, typically lead-generation, and consist of a single web page, where visitors ‘land’ on after clicking through from an ad banner or URL link. Because there is no navigation, engagement is focused rather than explorative, which means visitors are only tasked with one thing at a time and this makes conversion-rates much higher.

Capturing people’s attention is what captures leads

The key to why landing pages are so effective is their ability to capture people’s attention, which based on relevance and usefulness.

Because you are sending the user straight to a landing page, which consists of dedicated content, optimised marketing, and a simple way for customers to complete a purchase or signup, there’s very little reason for them to leave your page and look elsewhere for what they want.

Below is a visual breakdown of how a landing page is used to capture interest once the user is taken straight there (instead of the main website) via an online ad.

1. Engaging headline

With just a few seconds to capture the user’s attention, the landing page headline parallels that of the headline in the original ad to quickly establish relevance and leads with value to keep the user engaged.

 2. Main image

Imagery is used to support the headline. It also helps the user to connect with the promotion on a deeper level, as people are more receptive to visual communication than written text.

3. Main copy

Dedicated copy, rich with motivational language, is used to expand upon the initial lead-in and keep the reader engaged, all the whilst selling the promotion so that the user is prepped for conversion.

4. Call to action

The call to action (CTA) is where the user performs the desired action. This might be a sign-up, purchase, or download, and should involve nothing more than filling out a simple form or clicking a button. The CTA is really the whole point of having a landing page in the first place – making the process as clear and simple as possible.

Why you need a responsive email template

Mobile email attributes up to 70% of email opens, depending on your target audience, product and email type. – eMailmonday With the number of smartphone users in the UK dominating other forms of internet browsing, as well as the growing number of users at home migrating from desktop to tablet, now is the time to ensure your marketing efforts are optimised for mobile, which includes email. Email is still widely regarded as one of the most effective platforms for businesses to distribute content and market their products and services. So, it only makes perfect sense to optimise your mailer template to work across all mobile devices. How mobile-optimisation can improve your email marketing performance In the same way a non-responsive website renders differently on a mobile device, so does a non-responsive email template, sometimes failing to open altogether. This significantly reduces the number of people successfully reached, whilst negatively effecting your marketing spend, as each unsuccessful email is unlikely to generate any financial return. Furthermore, unresponsive emails that fail to open or look clumsy on mobile devices will set a bad precedent for your company image, which can lead to once loyal subscribers unsubscribing from your communication efforts. Make a good first impression Be mindful of what you put in your ‘from’ label, subject line and pre-header text (this is the short summary line that follows the subject line when viewed in the inbox), as you only have limited space to get your point across and grab the attention of your readers. Make it readable With such a small amount of screen space available on mobile devices, it’s so important to make mobile-optimised emails as succinct as possible. Avoid long paragraphs in the text-body and place the most relevant information at the top. This will ensure the reason/meaning for your email is understood right away. Buttons instead of hyperlinks The mentality for mobile users is to ‘press’ rather than ‘click’, so if you want them to perform specific actions, use a button instead of a hyperlink. Make it easy to spot and clearly signposted to explain why users should press that button – “Tap here to get your free download”, for example – and leave plenty of space around it to prevent any mishaps. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

Mobile email attributes up to 70% of email opens, depending on your target audience, product and email type.

– eMailmonday

With the number of smartphone users in the UK dominating other forms of internet browsing, as well as the growing number of users at home migrating from desktop to tablet, now is the time to ensure your marketing efforts are optimised for mobile, which includes email.

Email is still widely regarded as one of the most effective platforms for businesses to distribute content and market their products and services. So, it only makes perfect sense to optimise your mailer template to work across all mobile devices.

How mobile-optimisation can improve your email marketing performance

In the same way a non-responsive website renders differently on a mobile device, so does a non-responsive email template, sometimes failing to open altogether. This significantly reduces the number of people successfully reached, whilst negatively effecting your marketing spend, as each unsuccessful email is unlikely to generate any financial return.

Furthermore, unresponsive emails that fail to open or look clumsy on mobile devices will set a bad precedent for your company image, which can lead to once loyal subscribers unsubscribing from your communication efforts.

Make a good first impression

Be mindful of what you put in your ‘from’ label, subject line and pre-header text (this is the short summary line that follows the subject line when viewed in the inbox), as you only have limited space to get your point across and grab the attention of your readers.

Make it readable

With such a small amount of screen space available on mobile devices, it’s so important to make mobile-optimised emails as succinct as possible. Avoid long paragraphs in the text-body and place the most relevant information at the top. This will ensure the reason/meaning for your email is understood right away.

Buttons instead of hyperlinks

The mentality for mobile users is to ‘press’ rather than ‘click’, so if you want them to perform specific actions, use a button instead of a hyperlink. Make it easy to spot and clearly signposted to explain why users should press that button – “Tap here to get your free download”, for example – and leave plenty of space around it to prevent any mishaps.

Why you need to use email marketing

74% of UK consumers prefer to receive commercial communications via email, with more than half going on to make a purchase. – Econsultancy Even today, in this age of social media and mobile communication, email is still the preferential and most highly rated marketing channel in terms of its effectiveness by both consumers and marketers. Few things are more valuable to your marketing efforts than the data you have accumulated pertaining to both new and existing customers. And if you have yet to cultivate a mailing list, then now is the time to start building one. How email marketing can improve your business There’s a lot more to email marketing than pushing your latest products and services. Yes it’s an effective way of generating sales, but email marketing also has the capacity for long-term customer retention. It’s also great for brand awareness. Providing regular high-quality content via email – content your clients can really use – is a surefire way of retaining that relationship, keeping your business fresh in their minds for when they require your services in the future. It also demonstrates customer value. And quality content that’s shared beyond your existing customer-base is likelier to extend your reach and generate new business. Below is a visual representation of how the email marketing model works. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

74% of UK consumers prefer to receive commercial communications via email, with more than half going on to make a purchase.

– Econsultancy

Even today, in this age of social media and mobile communication, email is still the preferential and most highly rated marketing channel in terms of its effectiveness by both consumers and marketers.

Few things are more valuable to your marketing efforts than the data you have accumulated pertaining to both new and existing customers. And if you have yet to cultivate a mailing list, then now is the time to start building one.

How email marketing can improve your business

There’s a lot more to email marketing than pushing your latest products and services. Yes it’s an effective way of generating sales, but email marketing also has the capacity for long-term customer retention. It’s also great for brand awareness.

Providing regular high-quality content via email – content your clients can really use – is a surefire way of retaining that relationship, keeping your business fresh in their minds for when they require your services in the future. It also demonstrates customer value. And quality content that’s shared beyond your existing customer-base is likelier to extend your reach and generate new business.

Below is a visual representation of how the email marketing model works.

Why you need to cleanse your mailing list

Cleansing your email list now and again will not only help make it easier to measure the success of email marketing campaigns, it will also reduce marketing spend and save your business money in the longterm. So, with it being the start of new year, now would be the perfect time to go through your mailing list and make sure it’s in tip top shape for the rest of 2016. Here’s how: Re-engage longstanding inactive contacts first If you haven’t been through your mailing list in a while, there’s a good chance a fair number of contacts will have gone dormant over time. It’s likely that the majority of these contacts have simply tuned out to your regular send-outs, either because you weren’t offering relevant content, or because they’ve simply forgotten about you. Your first job is sorting these contacts from those who are permanently inactive by re-engaging them with a targeted campaign. This will allow you to identify which contacts are still valuable to your business and which ones are not. It’s important to know that any old, unused email addresses currently sitting on your list are potential spam traps; addresses that are used to identify organisations guilty of indiscriminately sending out emails for marketing purposes. Stagger your re-engagement campaign send-outs to avoid triggering any multiple spam-traps in one go, other wise you risk damaging the reputation of your brand through spam association. You could also get blacklisted altogether. Hard bounce vs soft bounce Evaluate the different bounces you receive upon sending out your first few campaigns and note the differences between ‘hard bounces’ and ‘soft bounces’ – your email platform should be able to tell you which is which. Create a suppression list When you’ve identified email addresses you no longer want to include in future campaigns, place them in a suppression list instead of deleting them. This will prevent them from somehow reappearing in your master list, as can often be the case. Consider double opt-in for future email signups, asking them to confirm their subscription to your communications, as customers often will sometimes agree to relieving emails without realising. This will likely reduce the number of contacts obtained, but the quality of leads captured will be significantly increased. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

Cleansing your email list now and again will not only help make it easier to measure the success of email marketing campaigns, it will also reduce marketing spend and save your business money in the longterm.

So, with it being the start of new year, now would be the perfect time to go through your mailing list and make sure it’s in tip top shape for the rest of 2016. Here’s how:

Re-engage longstanding inactive contacts first

If you haven’t been through your mailing list in a while, there’s a good chance a fair number of contacts will have gone dormant over time. It’s likely that the majority of these contacts have simply tuned out to your regular send-outs, either because you weren’t offering relevant content, or because they’ve simply forgotten about you.

Your first job is sorting these contacts from those who are permanently inactive by re-engaging them with a targeted campaign. This will allow you to identify which contacts are still valuable to your business and which ones are not.

It’s important to know that any old, unused email addresses currently sitting on your list are potential spam traps; addresses that are used to identify organisations guilty of indiscriminately sending out emails for marketing purposes.

Stagger your re-engagement campaign send-outs to avoid triggering any multiple spam-traps in one go, other wise you risk damaging the reputation of your brand through spam association. You could also get blacklisted altogether.

Hard bounce vs soft bounce

Evaluate the different bounces you receive upon sending out your first few campaigns and note the differences between ‘hard bounces’ and ‘soft bounces’ – your email platform should be able to tell you which is which.

Create a suppression list

When you’ve identified email addresses you no longer want to include in future campaigns, place them in a suppression list instead of deleting them. This will prevent them from somehow reappearing in your master list, as can often be the case.

Consider double opt-in for future email signups, asking them to confirm their subscription to your communications, as customers often will sometimes agree to relieving emails without realising. This will likely reduce the number of contacts obtained, but the quality of leads captured will be significantly increased.

Why you need to re-evaluate and (maybe) refresh your brand

A re-evaluation of your existing branding doesn’t mean you have to go ahead and change absolutely everything, let’s just get that out of way now. We’re not here to tell you that a new company name is needed for 2016, or that your website is outdated, oh no. However, it is a good idea to use this time to take a good look at your brand identity as it stands, checking whether the current branding accurately represents your business as it is now; your marketing objectives, company values, and your customers. And whether it can continue to represent your business well into the rest of the year. Then and now If your business has experienced significant change, perhaps adding to, or streamlining your services, maybe even growth, then you want this reflected in the branding for all your customers and competitors to see. A brand refresh, no matter how subtle, is an excellent way of demonstrating positive change within any organisation and shows signs of progression and success. This may involve changes to your website, developing new marketing messaging to align with new marketing objectives, or a subtle or dramatic adaptation of your company logo. Whatever you decide to implement, sometimes the simplest of changes are the most impactful. More than skin deep Do your employees and staff care as much about the success of the businesses as management do? This might sound like a strange question to ask in the context of things, but branding is so much more than just what’s on the surface. Branding extends to every facet of an organisation and this includes company culture. When branding is present behind the scenes as much as it is on the outside, it helps to create a sense of solidarity and investment amongst everybody inside the organisation; working together towards the same goals, reinforcing the same values and company ethos. If this doesn’t sound like it’s the case within your organisation then a brand refresh could be what’s needed to get everybody onboard. It also helps promote consistent brand messaging across all forms of client-customer communication across all areas of your company’s infrastructure. Revisit your company values The place to start when thinking about a new brand is the ethos that your company is founded upon, otherwise known as your core values. These are principles for starting a business to begin with; whether you wanted to make a social or cultural impact, provide a service that was not offered elsewhere, or change the way things are done in your specific industry. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

A re-evaluation of your existing branding doesn’t mean you have to go ahead and change absolutely everything, let’s just get that out of way now. We’re not here to tell you that a new company name is needed for 2016, or that your website is outdated, oh no.

However, it is a good idea to use this time to take a good look at your brand identity as it stands, checking whether the current branding accurately represents your business as it is now; your marketing objectives, company values, and your customers. And whether it can continue to represent your business well into the rest of the year.

Then and now

If your business has experienced significant change, perhaps adding to, or streamlining your services, maybe even growth, then you want this reflected in the branding for all your customers and competitors to see.

A brand refresh, no matter how subtle, is an excellent way of demonstrating positive change within any organisation and shows signs of progression and success. This may involve changes to your website, developing new marketing messaging to align with new marketing objectives, or a subtle or dramatic adaptation of your company logo. Whatever you decide to implement, sometimes the simplest of changes are the most impactful.

More than skin deep

Do your employees and staff care as much about the success of the businesses as management do? This might sound like a strange question to ask in the context of things, but branding is so much more than just what’s on the surface. Branding extends to every facet of an organisation and this includes company culture.

When branding is present behind the scenes as much as it is on the outside, it helps to create a sense of solidarity and investment amongst everybody inside the organisation; working together towards the same goals, reinforcing the same values and company ethos. If this doesn’t sound like it’s the case within your organisation then a brand refresh could be what’s needed to get everybody onboard. It also helps promote consistent brand messaging across all forms of client-customer communication across all areas of your company’s infrastructure.

Revisit your company values

The place to start when thinking about a new brand is the ethos that your company is founded upon, otherwise known as your core values. These are principles for starting a business to begin with; whether you wanted to make a social or cultural impact, provide a service that was not offered elsewhere, or change the way things are done in your specific industry.

Why you need to develop a brand promise

A brand promise isn’t just about assuring your customers, it’s about establishing your ideals and values, making sure everybody on board buys into the same concept. – Craig Barker, Koobr Developing a brand promise is something every business should consider, particularly when you’ve got specific selling points, pertaining to the quality of your service, that you would like to get across to your customers. But more than that, it’s about pinning down your company values and ideals, and that’s what consumers really buy in to, and the same thing goes for invested staff and employees. So if you haven’t already crafted a brand promise, now is the perfect time to come up with one. Connecting your purpose to the needs of your customers The whole point of marketing is to establish a solid, unquestionable connection with customers who are in need of services, and a strong brand promise is a huge part of that. It’s not a description of what your company does in a literal sense, it’s the reason for doing why you do what you do, conveyed in such a way for the customer to draw instant parallels with their own specific needs. This not only helps assure customers that your services are right for them – essential, in fact – it demonstrates a synchronicity of values, which goes a very long way towards forming a longstanding and trusted relationship. Some of our favourite brand promise examples… Apple – “Think Different.” Whilst IBM’s “Think” slogan was a testament to itself and their logical stance on all things technological, Apple’s sly alteration spoke to a whole generation of customers looking for something truly different than the same old corporate offerings in their IT products.   Coca-Cola – “To inspire moments of optimism and uplift.” Without mention of the product itself – as if they even need to – Coca-Cola instead talk about their purpose in such a way that it resonates with the feelings, and the reasons, people typically have when reaching out for bottle of the world’s most famous fizzy drink.   Rackspace – “Fanatical support.” Web hosting companies aren’t the most fascinating of industries to brag about, but the quality of their service and customer support is massively important to customers who require it. This is established as something Rackspace provide in their brand promise, emphasising the level of their commitment to ideological status. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

A brand promise isn’t just about assuring your customers, it’s about establishing your ideals and values, making sure everybody on board buys into the same concept.

– Craig Barker, Koobr

Developing a brand promise is something every business should consider, particularly when you’ve got specific selling points, pertaining to the quality of your service, that you would like to get across to your customers.

But more than that, it’s about pinning down your company values and ideals, and that’s what consumers really buy in to, and the same thing goes for invested staff and employees. So if you haven’t already crafted a brand promise, now is the perfect time to come up with one.

Connecting your purpose to the needs of your customers

The whole point of marketing is to establish a solid, unquestionable connection with customers who are in need of services, and a strong brand promise is a huge part of that.

It’s not a description of what your company does in a literal sense, it’s the reason for doing why you do what you do, conveyed in such a way for the customer to draw instant parallels with their own specific needs.

This not only helps assure customers that your services are right for them – essential, in fact – it demonstrates a synchronicity of values, which goes a very long way towards forming a longstanding and trusted relationship.

Some of our favourite brand promise examples…

Apple – “Think Different.”

Whilst IBM’s “Think” slogan was a testament to itself and their logical stance on all things technological, Apple’s sly alteration spoke to a whole generation of customers looking for something truly different than the same old corporate offerings in their IT products.

 

Coca-Cola – “To inspire moments of optimism and uplift.”

Without mention of the product itself – as if they even need to – Coca-Cola instead talk about their purpose in such a way that it resonates with the feelings, and the reasons, people typically have when reaching out for bottle of the world’s most famous fizzy drink.

 

Rackspace – “Fanatical support.”

Web hosting companies aren’t the most fascinating of industries to brag about, but the quality of their service and customer support is massively important to customers who require it. This is established as something Rackspace provide in their brand promise, emphasising the level of their commitment to ideological status.

Why you need quality digital content

If your website is the shopwindow of your business, then content is all those things a shop needs to stay relevant on the high street; marketing, customer service, brand communication – everything. – Lee Currie, Koobr Fresh, interesting and insightful content is essential to your online presence. Unfortunately, many businesses neglect their content output because they either underestimate its importance and effectiveness, or they simply don’t have the time to create content that is good quality. Putting content into context The internet is no longer built for pragmatic users only and anybody can connect with your business online, regardless of whether they are an existing customer or not. What you effectively have, is a shop for people to come and visit, browse your offerings and check out your brand. More than just a blog post, content is marketing. It’s customer service, brand communication – everything a customer expects when they engage with a professional business. It’s how you convey your personality and how you reflect the needs of your clients. Content is the digital voice of your entire organisation. All content is performance-driven Yes, some types of content are more directly focused on selling your products and service offerings, but all types of content have their place in improving the performance of your business online. When you’re writing about your industry, it establishes your business as an authority and helps to foster trust. When you’re writing for your target demographic, it generates engagement, and delivering engaging content to clients on a regular basis demonstrates customer value. And let’s not forget that your outreach is amplified when content is shared across social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.  Oh yes, and when you upload fresh content to your website on a regular basis, it shows Google that you are maintaining a useful, relevant and active website, which will help towards improving your search engine rankings. So you see, content isn’t just good for business, it’s a Must for your online presence. Be dynamic – Relevance is good, but only writing about your business, with a narrowed focus on your industry, isn’t going to please your readers all of the time. Broaden the topics of your content by thinking carefully about what else interests your target demographic. Be personable – Professionalism is ever so important when building lasting relationships, but so is personality. How much ‘personality’ you inject into your writing will depend on the nature of your business, so find a tone of voice that matches your brand. Writing how you speak (so long as spelling and grammar is correct) is usually the best way of engaging people. Be clear and concise – Break up lengthy bodies of text with headers and distill information into salient points for readability. People want information quickly, most probably because they’re browsing on the move or in the habit of consuming information in bite-sized portions, so format accordingly. Be different – There’s a lot of businesses competing for the attention of your customers, so …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

If your website is the shopwindow of your business, then content is all those things a shop needs to stay relevant on the high street; marketing, customer service, brand communication – everything.

– Lee Currie, Koobr

Fresh, interesting and insightful content is essential to your online presence. Unfortunately, many businesses neglect their content output because they either underestimate its importance and effectiveness, or they simply don’t have the time to create content that is good quality.

Putting content into context

The internet is no longer built for pragmatic users only and anybody can connect with your business online, regardless of whether they are an existing customer or not. What you effectively have, is a shop for people to come and visit, browse your offerings and check out your brand.

More than just a blog post, content is marketing. It’s customer service, brand communication – everything a customer expects when they engage with a professional business. It’s how you convey your personality and how you reflect the needs of your clients. Content is the digital voice of your entire organisation.

All content is performance-driven

Yes, some types of content are more directly focused on selling your products and service offerings, but all types of content have their place in improving the performance of your business online.

When you’re writing about your industry, it establishes your business as an authority and helps to foster trust. When you’re writing for your target demographic, it generates engagement, and delivering engaging content to clients on a regular basis demonstrates customer value. And let’s not forget that your outreach is amplified when content is shared across social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. 

Oh yes, and when you upload fresh content to your website on a regular basis, it shows Google that you are maintaining a useful, relevant and active website, which will help towards improving your search engine rankings. So you see, content isn’t just good for business, it’s a Must for your online presence.

Be dynamic – Relevance is good, but only writing about your business, with a narrowed focus on your industry, isn’t going to please your readers all of the time. Broaden the topics of your content by thinking carefully about what else interests your target demographic.

Be personable – Professionalism is ever so important when building lasting relationships, but so is personality. How much ‘personality’ you inject into your writing will depend on the nature of your business, so find a tone of voice that matches your brand. Writing how you speak (so long as spelling and grammar is correct) is usually the best way of engaging people.

Be clear and concise – Break up lengthy bodies of text with headers and distill information into salient points for readability. People want information quickly, most probably because they’re browsing on the move or in the habit of consuming information in bite-sized portions, so format accordingly.

Be different – There’s a lot of businesses competing for the attention of your customers, so

Why you need to optimise your website for mobile

Overall, smartphones are considered the preferential browsing device by internet users in the UK… – media.ofcom If your website is not optimised to work across mobile devices, you’re neglecting a significant proportion of users, resulting in far fewer people successfully connecting with your business online. Make 2016 the year you rectify this issue with a mobile-friendly website. Mobile is (literally) getting bigger Remember a time when mobile phones were getting smaller, when anything bigger than the size of a wallet was considered a cumbersome “brick”? Nowadays, mobile phones are used very differently. The majority of mobile phone users in the UK own a smartphone with internet access, spending twice as long online on their phones than on desktop devices. Changing customer engagement with your business The exponential growth in mobile browsing has led to a dramatic change in the way people use the internet, specifically the way new and existing customers engage with your business online. Whether your website is eCommerce or not, people will be viewing your website on a mobile device for any number of reasons; perhaps reading your blog, reviewing your service offerings, or finding out more about your company before getting in touch. If your current website is not optimised for mobile devices then mobile users are going to have a hard time doing any of these things. Mobile optimisation is essential for ranking on Google If your website is not optimised for mobile, it will no longer appear in the Google search results on a mobile device. And even if users did find their way on to your site, the likelihood is that content would not format properly and functionality would be hindered, making it difficult to navigate your site and access your services. The update was introduced in April last year and Google says it’s their way of ensuring mobile users are only provided with useful, relevant websites. Without a mobile-optimised website, your business is missing out on a significant number of customers, no matter how relevant your current website is to their needs. In fact, Google say that not having a mobile-optimised website is like closing your business to new and existing customers for one extra day in the week. How mobile-optimisation can improve  website performance Better usability and functionality Websites are interacted with differently on a mobile device than their desktop counterparts; swiping, pinching, and tapping to initiate actions. So it’s important to implement mobile-specific functions to improve usability. Content is also properly formatted, improving readability and making it easier for visitors to find what they need. Quicker performance Mobile-optimised websites are streamlined for quicker performance without compromising content and functionality. This prevents slowdown in load times which would otherwise deter mobile users. Cohesive brand experience When your website is optimised to work across devices other than just desktop, such as smartphones and tablets, it creates a better, more consistent brand experience for the user, fostering trust and reliability. …

Creative Resolutions, Insights|

Overall, smartphones are considered the preferential browsing device by internet users in the UK…

– media.ofcom

If your website is not optimised to work across mobile devices, you’re neglecting a significant proportion of users, resulting in far fewer people successfully connecting with your business online. Make 2016 the year you rectify this issue with a mobile-friendly website.

Mobile is (literally) getting bigger

Remember a time when mobile phones were getting smaller, when anything bigger than the size of a wallet was considered a cumbersome “brick”?

Nowadays, mobile phones are used very differently. The majority of mobile phone users in the UK own a smartphone with internet access, spending twice as long online on their phones than on desktop devices.

Changing customer engagement with your business

The exponential growth in mobile browsing has led to a dramatic change in the way people use the internet, specifically the way new and existing customers engage with your business online.

Whether your website is eCommerce or not, people will be viewing your website on a mobile device for any number of reasons; perhaps reading your blog, reviewing your service offerings, or finding out more about your company before getting in touch. If your current website is not optimised for mobile devices then mobile users are going to have a hard time doing any of these things.

Mobile optimisation is essential for ranking on Google

If your website is not optimised for mobile, it will no longer appear in the Google search results on a mobile device. And even if users did find their way on to your site, the likelihood is that content would not format properly and functionality would be hindered, making it difficult to navigate your site and access your services.

The update was introduced in April last year and Google says it’s their way of ensuring mobile users are only provided with useful, relevant websites. Without a mobile-optimised website, your business is missing out on a significant number of customers, no matter how relevant your current website is to their needs. In fact, Google say that not having a mobile-optimised website is like closing your business to new and existing customers for one extra day in the week.

How mobile-optimisation can improve  website performance

Better usability and functionality

Websites are interacted with differently on a mobile device than their desktop counterparts; swiping, pinching, and tapping to initiate actions. So it’s important to implement mobile-specific functions to improve usability. Content is also properly formatted, improving readability and making it easier for visitors to find what they need.

Quicker performance

Mobile-optimised websites are streamlined for quicker performance without compromising content and functionality. This prevents slowdown in load times which would otherwise deter mobile users.

Cohesive brand experience

When your website is optimised to work across devices other than just desktop, such as smartphones and tablets, it creates a better, more consistent brand experience for the user, fostering trust and reliability.

Biggest website trends you need to know in 2016

Whether you are thinking about a new website, or making a few tweaks to the old one, it certainly helps to know what’s fresh in the longterm. We take a look at some of the biggest website trends in 2016. Every year brings a new set of trends, especially in the ever-evolving world of tech and design. Whilst this can seem a bit of an imposition, it’s also a fantastic opportunity for businesses who want to freshen up their image and online marketing channel. Your website is the epitome of both those things, so it definitely pays to keep ahead of the curve. Here’s a few of the biggest website trends across design and functionality you need to know in 2016. Hero images are topping our ‘must haves’ Eye-catching imagery is kind of a big deal, it’s what users are drawn to when browsing on their desktops, smartphones, and tablets. Not just that, improved screen resolution across these devices has influenced the way we consume content to be more visual-centric. Hero images sit at the top of your webpage and are the first – sometimes only – thing that people see when they first arrive. When used correctly, hero images can capture the attention of your customers and communicate your marketing messages far more quickly and effectively than a simple text header. More businesses are starting to incorporate hero images across their websites, particularly on their homepage. Advances in bandwidth and data compression prevent slow load times for users, meaning more images of a higher quality are being used to full effect. Hamburgers are back on the menu Some people call it a slide menu, others refer to this three-lined navigation tool as a ‘drawer’ or a hamburger menu. Whatever you want to call it, this little button has received a moderate degree of criticism in the past for hiding off-screen features and being too nondescript in appearance. However, popularity of the so-called hamburger menu has grown with website owners who are looking for a cleaner, less is more approach, which itself is a growing trend in contemporary website design. In fact, widespread use of the hamburger menu has made this function more easily recognisable to users than initial concerns would have led you to believe. We’ve all become increasingly aware the functionality the hamburger menu offers through ubiquitous mobile apps and mobile-optimised webpages. Responsiveness is essential Speaking of mobile-optimised, responsiveness is not just a trend for 2016, it’s now essential. But many businesses have still yet to optimise their website to work across mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, which means they are neglecting a significant portion of their customer-base. Last year’s Google update now means websites that are not responsive will not appear in the search results listings on a mobile device. And even if users did find their way on to your site, the likelihood is that content would not format properly and functionality would be hindered, making it difficult to navigate your site and access …

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Whether you are thinking about a new website, or making a few tweaks to the old one, it certainly helps to know what’s fresh in the longterm. We take a look at some of the biggest website trends in 2016.

Every year brings a new set of trends, especially in the ever-evolving world of tech and design. Whilst this can seem a bit of an imposition, it’s also a fantastic opportunity for businesses who want to freshen up their image and online marketing channel.

Your website is the epitome of both those things, so it definitely pays to keep ahead of the curve. Here’s a few of the biggest website trends across design and functionality you need to know in 2016.

Hero images are topping our ‘must haves’

Eye-catching imagery is kind of a big deal, it’s what users are drawn to when browsing on their desktops, smartphones, and tablets. Not just that, improved screen resolution across these devices has influenced the way we consume content to be more visual-centric.

Hero images sit at the top of your webpage and are the first – sometimes only – thing that people see when they first arrive. When used correctly, hero images can capture the attention of your customers and communicate your marketing messages far more quickly and effectively than a simple text header.

More businesses are starting to incorporate hero images across their websites, particularly on their homepage. Advances in bandwidth and data compression prevent slow load times for users, meaning more images of a higher quality are being used to full effect.

Hamburgers are back on the menu

Some people call it a slide menu, others refer to this three-lined navigation tool as a ‘drawer’ or a hamburger menu. Whatever you want to call it, this little button has received a moderate degree of criticism in the past for hiding off-screen features and being too nondescript in appearance.

However, popularity of the so-called hamburger menu has grown with website owners who are looking for a cleaner, less is more approach, which itself is a growing trend in contemporary website design.

In fact, widespread use of the hamburger menu has made this function more easily recognisable to users than initial concerns would have led you to believe. We’ve all become increasingly aware the functionality the hamburger menu offers through ubiquitous mobile apps and mobile-optimised webpages.

Responsiveness is essential

Speaking of mobile-optimised, responsiveness is not just a trend for 2016, it’s now essential. But many businesses have still yet to optimise their website to work across mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, which means they are neglecting a significant portion of their customer-base.

Last year’s Google update now means websites that are not responsive will not appear in the search results listings on a mobile device. And even if users did find their way on to your site, the likelihood is that content would not format properly and functionality would be hindered, making it difficult to navigate your site and access